What is a chalazion? Identification and treatment

A chalazion is a small, slow-growing lump or cyst that develops within the eyelid. They are not usually painful and rarely last longer than a few weeks. A chalazion can develop when a meibomian gland at the edge of an eyelid becomes blocked or inflamed. These glands produce oil that lubricates the surface of the eye. In this article, we look at the symptoms of a chalazion and the differences between a chalazion and a stye. We also describe causes, home treatment, when to see a doctor, surgery, and prevention. Symptoms In the early stages, a chalazion appears as a...

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Eye care and safety

Your eyes are an important part of your health. Most people rely on their eyes to see and make sense of the world around them. But some eye diseases can lead to vision loss, so it is important to identify and treat eye diseases as early as possible. You should get your eyes checked as often as your health care provider recommends it, or if you have any new vision problems. And just as it is important to keep your body healthy, you also need to keep your eyes healthy. Eye Care Tips There are things you can do to help keep your...

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Computer Vision Problems

Computer Vision Problems

Computer vision problems or Digital eye strain is a group of eye and vision problems. The problems can include eyes that itch and tear, and are dry and red. Your eyes may feel tired or uncomfortable. You may not be able to focus normally. These problems are caused by lots of computer or digital device use. Using e-readers and smartphones may also cause these problems. These problems have been increasing in frequency over the past few decades. Many people have some symptoms if they use a computer or digital device for long periods. Most computer or digital device users have symptoms at least some of the...

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Uveitis

Overview Uveitis is a form of eye inflammation. It affects the middle layer of tissue in the eye wall (uvea). Uveitis (u-vee-I-tis) warning signs often come on suddenly and get worse quickly. They include eye redness, pain and blurred vision. The condition can affect one or both eyes, and it can affect people of all ages, even children. Possible causes of uveitis are infection, injury, or an autoimmune or inflammatory disease. Many times a cause can’t be identified. Uveitis can be serious, leading to permanent vision loss. Early diagnosis and treatment are important to prevent complications and preserve your vision....

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Prosthetic Contact Lenses

Prosthetic contact lenses are prescribed to mask flaws and improve the appearance of an eye disfigured from a birth defect, trauma, or eye disease. If certain structures of the injured or disfigured eye also fail to function properly, special prosthetic lenses can be designed to block excess light from reaching the back of the eye to reduce glare and increase comfort. Your eye care practitioner can match prosthetic contact lenses to the appearance of a healthy eye by using a pre-made trial set or by ordering custom-painted contact lenses. Like regular contact lenses, prosthetic contacts can be made of gas permeable or soft lens materials. And most prosthetic lenses can be...

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How to Maintain Your Eyeglasses

Though many of us wear glasses, very few of us realize the maintenance they actually need to keep our vision clear. Maintaining your eyewear isn’t difficult, but it does require special care. Read some of our tips for taking care of your eyeglasses Tips for Maintaining Your Glasses Avoid Chemical Contact Your glasses can be very fragile depending on how they were made. Some lenses have films on them to provide UV protection, scratch or shatter resistance, or even to enhance your prescription. These films are the most fragile part of your glasses, and they can easily be destroyed by...

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World sight Day 2021

EVERYONE COUNTS Nearly everyone on the planet will experience an eye health issue in their lifetime and more than a billion people worldwide do not have access to eye care services. To address the bigger picture at the country and global level, we need to be aware of our own eye health, and so our theme for 2021 is all about #LoveYourEyes. #LoveYourEyes is all about being aware of your own eye health and if you able, to get a sight test or recommend others do the same. Our eyes can also tell us so much about our general health...

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Leading causes of broken eyeglasses

Leading causes of broken eyeglasses

After years of working with patients and their broken glasses, my experience has been: Glasses were sat on (usually when put down on a bed while dressing/undressing), or stepped on. Glasses were damaged during a sports or recreational activity. Glasses were “altered” by a family pet…almost always a dog. Glasses were destroyed by a young child. Could be the child’s or the parent’s glasses. Glasses were damaged in luggage, backpack,etc. Glasses were damaged by owner while attempting to do a repair at home. Glasses were damaged by “unknown entity.” Were found destroyed on nightstand upon wakening. “They must have been...

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Anti reflective lenses

Glasses with anti-reflective coating have grown in popularity as more jobs demand that employees spend time behind a computer. Everyday use of smartphones, TV viewing, and other gadgets with screens can strain the eyes even further. In the past, AR coating was a nuisance because it would easily peel off, scratch, and get dirty easily. Today’s AR-coated lenses have improved. Their anti-reflective capabilities are “seared” into the lens. Anti-reflective coating, also called AR coating, is created to: Block UV rays to enhance eye protection. Block blue light, which can help with eye strain, blurry vision, and dry eyes. Resist smudges and scratches. Stop...

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Ocular hypertension

Ocular Hypertension Overview The term ocular hypertension usually refers to any situation in which the pressure inside the eye, called intraocular pressure, is higher than normal. Eye pressure is measured in millimeters of mercury (mm Hg). Normal eye pressure ranges from 10-21 mm Hg. Ocular hypertension is an eye pressure of greater than 21 mm Hg. Although its definition has evolved through the years, ocular hypertension is commonly defined as a condition with the following criteria: An intraocular pressure of greater than 21 mm Hg is measured in one or both eyes at two or more office visits. Pressure inside the eye is measured...

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